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A scene from fu-GEN Theatre Company's Sex Tape Project

A scene from fu-GEN Theatre Company’s Sex Tape Project

The schedule for the fourth National Asian American Theater Conference and Festival has been posted on the website for The Consortium of Asian American Theaters and Artists (CAATA). While some programming was previously known, there’s a lot of new stuff – including details about a panel on which I’ll be appearing! Events will be held in multiple locations in Philadelphia October 8-12, 2014.

Among the featured performances is the Toronto-based fu-GEN Theatre Company’s Sex Tape Project, an intriguing-sounding, site-specific piece in which audience members are given headphones and binoculars to watch a performance unfolding in a hotel across the street. However, while everyone watches the same events, three different audio tracks are played so that different people will hear different plays.

Dan Kwong’s What? No Ping-Pong Balls? tells the story of the writer/performer’s late mother, and features world-renowned drummer Kenny Endo performing a live musical score. I’ve seen a number of Dan’s pieces over the years, and he’s visited my Asian American Theater class a few times so I know that he’s smart, funny, and a truly terrific performer.

Additional performances include Soomi Kim’s Chang(e) and Sue Jin Song’s Children of Medea. Dennis Kim’s Tree City Legends, Christopher Chen’s Caught, and Eiko Otake’s Station will be partner productions of the festival. There will also be a CAATA Performance Showcase that features Perry Yung and Rick Ebihara from SLANT, Viet Nguyen’s Reincarnation Soup, Kat Evasco in Mommy Queerest, and Anu Yadav’s Meena’s Dream. A series of play readings will also be held, featuring the work of Jeremy Tiang, Melissa Tien, Saymoukda Vongsay, and May Lee Yang.

Several plenary discussions and breakout sessions will bring artists and scholars together to explore aspects of Asian American performance. I’ll be appearing on a panel on The State of Asian American Theatre, held Saturday, October 11. My fellow panelists – including playwright Jeremy Tiang, scholar Esther Kim Lee, and actor/playwright Jeanne Sakata – will be discussing how the stage has been used to imagine and represent “home.”

Roger Tang, whom I previously interviewed on this blog, will be appearing as part of Elsewhere and Otherwise: Asian American Performance Beyond CA and NY. Among the many other noteworthy participants serving on various panels are Pun Bandhu, Leslie Ishii, May Joseph, Victor Maog, Randy Reyes, Karen Shimakawa, and Rick Shiomi.

For a full program guide to events at the National Asian American Theater Conference and Festival, visit http://2014.caata.net/.

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